The Role of Gender, Child Maltreatment, Alcohol Expectancies, and Personality Pathology on Relationship Violence Among Undergraduates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Male (n = 1,104) and female (n = 1,337) college students’ self-report surveys on childhood maltreatment, alcohol expectancies, and narcissistic personality traits are examined to determine their associations with relationship violence. Intimate partner violence was measured using the violence subscales of the revised Conflict Tactics. Because we were interested in the effects of gender and because z tests of the correlations and t tests of means indicated men and women differed significantly on several variables, ordinary least squares regression models were run separately for men and women. Results suggest there are both gender similarities and differences. Relationship violence was associated with child sexual abuse for both men and women, whereas high scores on negative alcohol expectancies and vulnerable narcissism, and low scores on grandiose narcissism, were significantly associated with violence for men only. In addition, z tests revealed the regression coefficients for child sexual abuse and negative alcohol expectancies were significantly different for men and women. Child sexual abuse and alcohol expectancies had stronger associations with men’s than women’s violent behavior. In addition, the models explained a greater amount of variance in men’s than in women’s behavior. Policy implications of the research will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 1 2018

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Child Abuse
Violence
Personality
Alcohols
Pathology
Sexual Child Abuse
Narcissism
Least-Squares Analysis
Self Report
Students
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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title = "The Role of Gender, Child Maltreatment, Alcohol Expectancies, and Personality Pathology on Relationship Violence Among Undergraduates",
abstract = "Male (n = 1,104) and female (n = 1,337) college students’ self-report surveys on childhood maltreatment, alcohol expectancies, and narcissistic personality traits are examined to determine their associations with relationship violence. Intimate partner violence was measured using the violence subscales of the revised Conflict Tactics. Because we were interested in the effects of gender and because z tests of the correlations and t tests of means indicated men and women differed significantly on several variables, ordinary least squares regression models were run separately for men and women. Results suggest there are both gender similarities and differences. Relationship violence was associated with child sexual abuse for both men and women, whereas high scores on negative alcohol expectancies and vulnerable narcissism, and low scores on grandiose narcissism, were significantly associated with violence for men only. In addition, z tests revealed the regression coefficients for child sexual abuse and negative alcohol expectancies were significantly different for men and women. Child sexual abuse and alcohol expectancies had stronger associations with men’s than women’s violent behavior. In addition, the models explained a greater amount of variance in men’s than in women’s behavior. Policy implications of the research will be discussed.",
author = "Menard, {Kimberly Sue} and Dowgwillo, {Emily A.} and Pincus, {Aaron Lee}",
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