The Role of Gender in Mentoring: Implications for Diversified and Homogenous Mentoring Relationships

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103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the effects of gender composition of mentoring relationships on protégés' perceptions of the degree of role modeling and psychosocial and career development mentoring functions received. Data from 200 mentor/protégé dyads composed of working professionals from a variety of industries were analyzed using ANCOVA with planned comparisons. Results indicated that mentoring relationships involving female mentors in either homogeneous or diversified relationships provided more role modeling and less career development than relationships involving male mentors. Unexpectedly, male mentors in homogeneous relationships were associated with lower levels of role modeling than female mentors in either homogeneous or diversified relationships. Homogeneous male relationships also offered less psychosocial support than female mentors in diversified relationships with male protégés. Male mentors in diversified relationships with female protégés were associated with more career development than any other gender combination of mentoring relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)102-122
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Vocational Behavior
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Mentors
mentoring
gender
career
psychosocial care
dyad
Mentoring
industry
Industry
Mentor

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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title = "The Role of Gender in Mentoring: Implications for Diversified and Homogenous Mentoring Relationships",
abstract = "The present study examined the effects of gender composition of mentoring relationships on prot{\'e}g{\'e}s' perceptions of the degree of role modeling and psychosocial and career development mentoring functions received. Data from 200 mentor/prot{\'e}g{\'e} dyads composed of working professionals from a variety of industries were analyzed using ANCOVA with planned comparisons. Results indicated that mentoring relationships involving female mentors in either homogeneous or diversified relationships provided more role modeling and less career development than relationships involving male mentors. Unexpectedly, male mentors in homogeneous relationships were associated with lower levels of role modeling than female mentors in either homogeneous or diversified relationships. Homogeneous male relationships also offered less psychosocial support than female mentors in diversified relationships with male prot{\'e}g{\'e}s. Male mentors in diversified relationships with female prot{\'e}g{\'e}s were associated with more career development than any other gender combination of mentoring relationship.",
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