The role of medication use and health on the decision to quit drinking among older adults

Kristine E. Pringle, Debra A. Heller, Frank M. Ahern, Carol H. Gold, Theresa V. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the extent to which changes in medication use and health influence the decision to quit drinking among older adults. Method: The sample consisted of 8,883 elderly enrolled in Pennsylvania's Pharmaceutical Assistance Contract for the Elderly (PA-PACE) program who completed surveys in 2000 and 2002. Survey data were linked with prescription claims to examine medication and health factors associated with drinking cessation between baseline and follow-up. Results: Overall, 3.9% of those using alcohol at baseline quit drinking during the study period. Logistic regression results showed that individuals who initiated antipsychotic (OR = 2.92) and antineoplastic therapies (OR = 2.67) were the most likely to quit drinking. Discussion: These findings support the hypothesis that elderly quit drinking in response to ill health. Results have implications for alcohol interventions in older adults and underscore the importance of separating former drinkers from lifetime abstainers in the study of alcohol-health relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)837-851
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

Fingerprint

Drinking
medication
alcohol
Health
health
Alcohols
pharmaceutical
Contracts
assistance
Antineoplastic Agents
logistics
Antipsychotic Agents
Prescriptions
regression
Logistic Models
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Pringle, Kristine E. ; Heller, Debra A. ; Ahern, Frank M. ; Gold, Carol H. ; Brown, Theresa V. / The role of medication use and health on the decision to quit drinking among older adults. In: Journal of Aging and Health. 2006 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 837-851.
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The role of medication use and health on the decision to quit drinking among older adults. / Pringle, Kristine E.; Heller, Debra A.; Ahern, Frank M.; Gold, Carol H.; Brown, Theresa V.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 18, No. 6, 01.12.2006, p. 837-851.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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