The role of MRI when relapsing polychondritis is suspected but not proven

John A. Fornadley, Donna J. Seibert, Barbara E. Ostrov, W. Stuart Warren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relapsing polychondritis (RP), while relatively rare, presents a characteristic clinical picture. Based upon a symptom complex of auricular, nasal, and respiratory chondritis associated with ocular and otic complaints, diagnosis can frequently be made with confidence in the absence of histologic confirmation. We present a case where a therapeutic intervention was required without sufficient criteria for diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) proved useful in initial evaluation and allowed follow-up imaging demonstrating a gratifying response to steroid treatment. We believe that MRI has an important role in the diagnosis and subsequent evaluation of patients with proven or suspected RP, particularly those with tracheal involvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-107
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1995

Fingerprint

Relapsing Polychondritis
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Nose
Ear
Steroids
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Fornadley, John A. ; Seibert, Donna J. ; Ostrov, Barbara E. ; Warren, W. Stuart. / The role of MRI when relapsing polychondritis is suspected but not proven. In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology. 1995 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 101-107.
@article{78c4af5112ad47c5abffc75df68f5695,
title = "The role of MRI when relapsing polychondritis is suspected but not proven",
abstract = "Relapsing polychondritis (RP), while relatively rare, presents a characteristic clinical picture. Based upon a symptom complex of auricular, nasal, and respiratory chondritis associated with ocular and otic complaints, diagnosis can frequently be made with confidence in the absence of histologic confirmation. We present a case where a therapeutic intervention was required without sufficient criteria for diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) proved useful in initial evaluation and allowed follow-up imaging demonstrating a gratifying response to steroid treatment. We believe that MRI has an important role in the diagnosis and subsequent evaluation of patients with proven or suspected RP, particularly those with tracheal involvement.",
author = "Fornadley, {John A.} and Seibert, {Donna J.} and Ostrov, {Barbara E.} and Warren, {W. Stuart}",
year = "1995",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0165-5876(94)01068-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "101--107",
journal = "International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology",
issn = "0165-5876",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "1",

}

The role of MRI when relapsing polychondritis is suspected but not proven. / Fornadley, John A.; Seibert, Donna J.; Ostrov, Barbara E.; Warren, W. Stuart.

In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.1995, p. 101-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of MRI when relapsing polychondritis is suspected but not proven

AU - Fornadley, John A.

AU - Seibert, Donna J.

AU - Ostrov, Barbara E.

AU - Warren, W. Stuart

PY - 1995/1

Y1 - 1995/1

N2 - Relapsing polychondritis (RP), while relatively rare, presents a characteristic clinical picture. Based upon a symptom complex of auricular, nasal, and respiratory chondritis associated with ocular and otic complaints, diagnosis can frequently be made with confidence in the absence of histologic confirmation. We present a case where a therapeutic intervention was required without sufficient criteria for diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) proved useful in initial evaluation and allowed follow-up imaging demonstrating a gratifying response to steroid treatment. We believe that MRI has an important role in the diagnosis and subsequent evaluation of patients with proven or suspected RP, particularly those with tracheal involvement.

AB - Relapsing polychondritis (RP), while relatively rare, presents a characteristic clinical picture. Based upon a symptom complex of auricular, nasal, and respiratory chondritis associated with ocular and otic complaints, diagnosis can frequently be made with confidence in the absence of histologic confirmation. We present a case where a therapeutic intervention was required without sufficient criteria for diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) proved useful in initial evaluation and allowed follow-up imaging demonstrating a gratifying response to steroid treatment. We believe that MRI has an important role in the diagnosis and subsequent evaluation of patients with proven or suspected RP, particularly those with tracheal involvement.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028797764&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028797764&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0165-5876(94)01068-9

DO - 10.1016/0165-5876(94)01068-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 7729987

AN - SCOPUS:0028797764

VL - 31

SP - 101

EP - 107

JO - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

JF - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

SN - 0165-5876

IS - 1

ER -