The role of particle size distribution of suspended solids in defining the sensory properties of milk chocolate

Gregory R. Ziegler, Gagan Mongia, Ruth Hollender

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

The melting of chocolate in the mouth is a dynamic process. The time evolution of the perceived flavor and texture of chocolate during fat melting and sugar dissolution has been observed and quantified using time-intensity sensory methodology. Five milk chocolates varying in particle size distribution and rheology were prepared. Additionally, two chocolates varying in particle size were standardized to the same viscosity. Particle size and rheology significantly influenced effort, thickness, chocolate and sweetness attributes, although in some unanticipated ways. Averaging time-intensity responses to produce consensus curves generally yielded the same conclusions as averaging parameters extracted from individual curves. However, the later were amenable to statistical analysis using ANOVA and partial least squares regression. Multivariate analysis was a useful technique for identifying those physical properties most correlated with sensory perception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-370
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Food Properties
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science

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