The role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma

Zayna Nahas, David Goldenberg, Carol Fakhry, Marjorie Ewertz, Martha Zeiger, Paul W. Ladenson, Richard Wahl, Ralph P. Tufano

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) fusion imaging in the detection and management of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer. Study Design: A retrospective analysis of 33 patients with suspected recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma who had undergone PET/CT was performed. PET/CT was compared with standard imaging techniques in each patient to determine whether PET/CT contributed to the therapeutic management plan. Histopathological findings were correlated to PET/CT in patients who imderwent surgery. Methods: The senior author reviewed the charts of 33 patients with recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma to determine the impact PET/CT had on management. PET/CT was compared with conventional imaging results. In surgical patients, PET/CT was compared with histopathological findings to determine its sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. Results: In 67% of the cases (22 of 33), PET/CT supplied additional information that altered or confirmed the management plan. Twenty of 33 patients underwent surgery with 36 sites assessed by histopathological analysis. PET/CT correlated with histopathological findings in 25 of 36 distinct anatomical sites, with an accuracy of 70%. The sensitivity of PET/CT in identifying recurrence was found to be 66%, with a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 27%. Conclusion: Combined PET/CT fusion scanning was most useful in the detection and management of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer in patients who had average thyroglobulin levels greater than 10 ng/mL and when the tumor no longer concentrated radioactive iodine. In 100% of the cases in which PET/CT localized a region suspicious for malignancy, histopathological analysis confirmed the results. When PET/CT is positive, it is a powerful tool for predicting exact locations of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer, thus making it a reliable guide for surgical planning. PET/CT is a supplement to conventional imaging and fine-needle aspiration in the workup of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer. A negative finding on PET/CT is not sufficiently reliable to preclude further investigation and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-243
Number of pages7
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume115
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005

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Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography
Papillary Thyroid cancer
Thyroglobulin
Fine Needle Biopsy
Iodine
Neoplasms
Recurrence
Sensitivity and Specificity
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Nahas, Zayna ; Goldenberg, David ; Fakhry, Carol ; Ewertz, Marjorie ; Zeiger, Martha ; Ladenson, Paul W. ; Wahl, Richard ; Tufano, Ralph P. / The role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma. In: Laryngoscope. 2005 ; Vol. 115, No. 2. pp. 237-243.
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abstract = "Objectives/Hypothesis: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) fusion imaging in the detection and management of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer. Study Design: A retrospective analysis of 33 patients with suspected recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma who had undergone PET/CT was performed. PET/CT was compared with standard imaging techniques in each patient to determine whether PET/CT contributed to the therapeutic management plan. Histopathological findings were correlated to PET/CT in patients who imderwent surgery. Methods: The senior author reviewed the charts of 33 patients with recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma to determine the impact PET/CT had on management. PET/CT was compared with conventional imaging results. In surgical patients, PET/CT was compared with histopathological findings to determine its sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. Results: In 67{\%} of the cases (22 of 33), PET/CT supplied additional information that altered or confirmed the management plan. Twenty of 33 patients underwent surgery with 36 sites assessed by histopathological analysis. PET/CT correlated with histopathological findings in 25 of 36 distinct anatomical sites, with an accuracy of 70{\%}. The sensitivity of PET/CT in identifying recurrence was found to be 66{\%}, with a specificity of 100{\%}, a positive predictive value of 100{\%}, and a negative predictive value of 27{\%}. Conclusion: Combined PET/CT fusion scanning was most useful in the detection and management of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer in patients who had average thyroglobulin levels greater than 10 ng/mL and when the tumor no longer concentrated radioactive iodine. In 100{\%} of the cases in which PET/CT localized a region suspicious for malignancy, histopathological analysis confirmed the results. When PET/CT is positive, it is a powerful tool for predicting exact locations of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer, thus making it a reliable guide for surgical planning. PET/CT is a supplement to conventional imaging and fine-needle aspiration in the workup of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer. A negative finding on PET/CT is not sufficiently reliable to preclude further investigation and treatment.",
author = "Zayna Nahas and David Goldenberg and Carol Fakhry and Marjorie Ewertz and Martha Zeiger and Ladenson, {Paul W.} and Richard Wahl and Tufano, {Ralph P.}",
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The role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma. / Nahas, Zayna; Goldenberg, David; Fakhry, Carol; Ewertz, Marjorie; Zeiger, Martha; Ladenson, Paul W.; Wahl, Richard; Tufano, Ralph P.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 115, No. 2, 01.02.2005, p. 237-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of positron emission tomography/computed tomography in the management of recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma

AU - Nahas, Zayna

AU - Goldenberg, David

AU - Fakhry, Carol

AU - Ewertz, Marjorie

AU - Zeiger, Martha

AU - Ladenson, Paul W.

AU - Wahl, Richard

AU - Tufano, Ralph P.

PY - 2005/2/1

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N2 - Objectives/Hypothesis: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) fusion imaging in the detection and management of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer. Study Design: A retrospective analysis of 33 patients with suspected recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma who had undergone PET/CT was performed. PET/CT was compared with standard imaging techniques in each patient to determine whether PET/CT contributed to the therapeutic management plan. Histopathological findings were correlated to PET/CT in patients who imderwent surgery. Methods: The senior author reviewed the charts of 33 patients with recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma to determine the impact PET/CT had on management. PET/CT was compared with conventional imaging results. In surgical patients, PET/CT was compared with histopathological findings to determine its sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. Results: In 67% of the cases (22 of 33), PET/CT supplied additional information that altered or confirmed the management plan. Twenty of 33 patients underwent surgery with 36 sites assessed by histopathological analysis. PET/CT correlated with histopathological findings in 25 of 36 distinct anatomical sites, with an accuracy of 70%. The sensitivity of PET/CT in identifying recurrence was found to be 66%, with a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 27%. Conclusion: Combined PET/CT fusion scanning was most useful in the detection and management of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer in patients who had average thyroglobulin levels greater than 10 ng/mL and when the tumor no longer concentrated radioactive iodine. In 100% of the cases in which PET/CT localized a region suspicious for malignancy, histopathological analysis confirmed the results. When PET/CT is positive, it is a powerful tool for predicting exact locations of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer, thus making it a reliable guide for surgical planning. PET/CT is a supplement to conventional imaging and fine-needle aspiration in the workup of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer. A negative finding on PET/CT is not sufficiently reliable to preclude further investigation and treatment.

AB - Objectives/Hypothesis: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) fusion imaging in the detection and management of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer. Study Design: A retrospective analysis of 33 patients with suspected recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma who had undergone PET/CT was performed. PET/CT was compared with standard imaging techniques in each patient to determine whether PET/CT contributed to the therapeutic management plan. Histopathological findings were correlated to PET/CT in patients who imderwent surgery. Methods: The senior author reviewed the charts of 33 patients with recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma to determine the impact PET/CT had on management. PET/CT was compared with conventional imaging results. In surgical patients, PET/CT was compared with histopathological findings to determine its sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. Results: In 67% of the cases (22 of 33), PET/CT supplied additional information that altered or confirmed the management plan. Twenty of 33 patients underwent surgery with 36 sites assessed by histopathological analysis. PET/CT correlated with histopathological findings in 25 of 36 distinct anatomical sites, with an accuracy of 70%. The sensitivity of PET/CT in identifying recurrence was found to be 66%, with a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 27%. Conclusion: Combined PET/CT fusion scanning was most useful in the detection and management of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer in patients who had average thyroglobulin levels greater than 10 ng/mL and when the tumor no longer concentrated radioactive iodine. In 100% of the cases in which PET/CT localized a region suspicious for malignancy, histopathological analysis confirmed the results. When PET/CT is positive, it is a powerful tool for predicting exact locations of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer, thus making it a reliable guide for surgical planning. PET/CT is a supplement to conventional imaging and fine-needle aspiration in the workup of recurrent papillary thyroid cancer. A negative finding on PET/CT is not sufficiently reliable to preclude further investigation and treatment.

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