The role of race/ethnicity and race relations on public opinion related to the immigration and crime link

George E. Higgins, Shaun L. Gabbidon, Favian Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines two hypotheses related to public opinion concerning immigration and crime. Using data from a recent Gallup poll with oversamples of Hispanics and Blacks, the research examined whether race/ethnicity and race relations matter in the public's opinion of the connection between immigration and crime. After a series of models were performed, results of the final model revealed that race relations, gender (specifically, being male), race/ethnicity, and immigrant status are influential in contextualizing public opinion on the topic. The meaning and policy implications of these findings are also reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-56
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Criminal Justice
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Race Relations
Public Opinion
Emigration and Immigration
Crime
public opinion
immigration
ethnicity
offense
Hispanic Americans
gender relations
immigrant
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

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The role of race/ethnicity and race relations on public opinion related to the immigration and crime link. / Higgins, George E.; Gabbidon, Shaun L.; Martin, Favian.

In: Journal of Criminal Justice, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 51-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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