The role of social and built environments in predicting self-rated stress

A multilevel analysis in Philadelphia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most studies of the predictors of stress focus on individual characteristics. Linking multiple contextual data sources to an individual-level health survey, we explore the associations of both built and social environment determinants with self-rated stress. At the individual level few social factors were significant predictors, although neighborhood trust and food insecurity have independent effects on stress. At the neighborhood level, the presence of hazardous waste sites and traffic volume were determinants of self-rated stress even after controlling for other individual characteristics. The latter two factors are of relevance to public health policy as they are potentially modifiable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)803-810
Number of pages8
JournalHealth and Place
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Multilevel Analysis
Social Environment
multi-level analysis
Hazardous Waste Sites
Food Supply
Information Storage and Retrieval
Public Policy
Health Policy
Health Surveys
Health Status
Public Health
determinants
hazardous waste
health survey
health policy
nutrition situation
traffic volume
social factors
public health
food

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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The role of social and built environments in predicting self-rated stress : A multilevel analysis in Philadelphia. / Yang, Tse Chuan; Matthews, Stephen Augustus.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 16, No. 5, 01.01.2010, p. 803-810.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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