The role of system-justification motivation, group status and system threat in directing support for hate crimes legislation

Robyn K. Mallett, Jeffrey R. Huntsinger, Janet K. Swim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine factors that explain variability in attitudes toward hate crimes legislation. We find that one's posture toward the current social system directs the conditions under which characteristics of hate crimes exert the most influence. System-justification motivation is negatively related to support for hate crimes legislation (Studies 1-3). This relation is partially mediated by perceptions of harm from hate crimes. Specifically, when hate crimes target low-status groups, system-justification motivation is negatively related to perceived harm and support for hate crimes legislation. Attitudes are unaffected when high-status groups are targeted. The status of the group targeted, perceptions of hate crimes as representative of the status quo, and temporarily enhanced feelings of system threat moderate this relation (Studies 2-4).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)384-390
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

Fingerprint

Hate
hate crime
status group
Crime
Legislation
Motivation
legislation
threat
group perception
social system
Posture
Emotions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

@article{0ca79f3c1e6149668f0c537b14ba4b70,
title = "The role of system-justification motivation, group status and system threat in directing support for hate crimes legislation",
abstract = "We examine factors that explain variability in attitudes toward hate crimes legislation. We find that one's posture toward the current social system directs the conditions under which characteristics of hate crimes exert the most influence. System-justification motivation is negatively related to support for hate crimes legislation (Studies 1-3). This relation is partially mediated by perceptions of harm from hate crimes. Specifically, when hate crimes target low-status groups, system-justification motivation is negatively related to perceived harm and support for hate crimes legislation. Attitudes are unaffected when high-status groups are targeted. The status of the group targeted, perceptions of hate crimes as representative of the status quo, and temporarily enhanced feelings of system threat moderate this relation (Studies 2-4).",
author = "Mallett, {Robyn K.} and Huntsinger, {Jeffrey R.} and Swim, {Janet K.}",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jesp.2010.10.014",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "47",
pages = "384--390",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Social Psychology",
issn = "0022-1031",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "2",

}

The role of system-justification motivation, group status and system threat in directing support for hate crimes legislation. / Mallett, Robyn K.; Huntsinger, Jeffrey R.; Swim, Janet K.

In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 47, No. 2, 01.03.2011, p. 384-390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of system-justification motivation, group status and system threat in directing support for hate crimes legislation

AU - Mallett, Robyn K.

AU - Huntsinger, Jeffrey R.

AU - Swim, Janet K.

PY - 2011/3/1

Y1 - 2011/3/1

N2 - We examine factors that explain variability in attitudes toward hate crimes legislation. We find that one's posture toward the current social system directs the conditions under which characteristics of hate crimes exert the most influence. System-justification motivation is negatively related to support for hate crimes legislation (Studies 1-3). This relation is partially mediated by perceptions of harm from hate crimes. Specifically, when hate crimes target low-status groups, system-justification motivation is negatively related to perceived harm and support for hate crimes legislation. Attitudes are unaffected when high-status groups are targeted. The status of the group targeted, perceptions of hate crimes as representative of the status quo, and temporarily enhanced feelings of system threat moderate this relation (Studies 2-4).

AB - We examine factors that explain variability in attitudes toward hate crimes legislation. We find that one's posture toward the current social system directs the conditions under which characteristics of hate crimes exert the most influence. System-justification motivation is negatively related to support for hate crimes legislation (Studies 1-3). This relation is partially mediated by perceptions of harm from hate crimes. Specifically, when hate crimes target low-status groups, system-justification motivation is negatively related to perceived harm and support for hate crimes legislation. Attitudes are unaffected when high-status groups are targeted. The status of the group targeted, perceptions of hate crimes as representative of the status quo, and temporarily enhanced feelings of system threat moderate this relation (Studies 2-4).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79651469391&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79651469391&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jesp.2010.10.014

DO - 10.1016/j.jesp.2010.10.014

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:79651469391

VL - 47

SP - 384

EP - 390

JO - Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

JF - Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

SN - 0022-1031

IS - 2

ER -