The roles of writing knowledge, motivation, strategic behaviors, and skills in predicting elementary students’ persuasive writing from source material

Kay Wijekumar, Steve Graham, Karen R. Harris, Pui-wa Lei, Ashley Barkel, Angelique Aitken, Amber Ray, Julia Houston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A core tenet of the model of domain learning is that learning is shaped by cognitive and motivational forces. In writing, these catalysts include learners’ knowledge, motivation, strategic behaviors, and skills. This study tested this proposition at two time points (Fall and Spring) with 179 fifth-grade students (52% were girls), examining if writing knowledge, motivation, strategic behavior, and skills each made a statistically significant and unique contribution to predicting writing quality and output on social studies persuasive writing tasks, after variance due to the other catalysts and reading comprehension were first controlled. Three of the four catalysts (writing knowledge, strategic behaviors, and skills) each accounted for statistically significant and unique variance in predicting writing quality, number of words, or both at each assessment point. These findings provided partial support for the model of domain learning as applied to writing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1431-1457
Number of pages27
JournalReading and Writing
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2019

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Motivation
Students
student
Learning
learning
social studies
Reading
comprehension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Wijekumar, Kay ; Graham, Steve ; Harris, Karen R. ; Lei, Pui-wa ; Barkel, Ashley ; Aitken, Angelique ; Ray, Amber ; Houston, Julia. / The roles of writing knowledge, motivation, strategic behaviors, and skills in predicting elementary students’ persuasive writing from source material. In: Reading and Writing. 2019 ; Vol. 32, No. 6. pp. 1431-1457.
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The roles of writing knowledge, motivation, strategic behaviors, and skills in predicting elementary students’ persuasive writing from source material. / Wijekumar, Kay; Graham, Steve; Harris, Karen R.; Lei, Pui-wa; Barkel, Ashley; Aitken, Angelique; Ray, Amber; Houston, Julia.

In: Reading and Writing, Vol. 32, No. 6, 15.06.2019, p. 1431-1457.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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