The scaffold protein, Homer1b/c, regulates axon pathfinding in the central nervous system in vivo

Lisa Foa, Indrani Rajan, Kurt Haas, Gang Yi Wu, Paul Brakeman, Paul Worley, Hollis Cline

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Homer proteins are a family of multidomain cytosolic proteins that have been postulated to serve as scaffold proteins that affect responses to extracellular signals by regulating protein-protein interactions. We tested whether Homer proteins are involved in axon pathfinding in vivo, by expressing both wild-type and mutant isoforms of Homer in Xenopus optic tectal neurons. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that interfering with the ability of endogenous Homer to form protein-protein interactions resulted in axon pathfinding errors at stereotypical choice points. These data demonstrate a function for scaffold proteins such as Homer in axon guidance. Homer may facilitate signal transduction from cell-surface receptors to intracellular proteins that govern the establishment of axon trajectories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-506
Number of pages8
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume4
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

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    Foa, L., Rajan, I., Haas, K., Wu, G. Y., Brakeman, P., Worley, P., & Cline, H. (2001). The scaffold protein, Homer1b/c, regulates axon pathfinding in the central nervous system in vivo. Nature Neuroscience, 4(5), 499-506. https://doi.org/10.1038/87447