The schooling effect on neurocognitive development: Implications of a new scientific frontier for comparative education

Daniel Salinas, David P. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent developments in neuroscience have generated great expectations in the education world globally. However, building a bridge between brain science and education has been hard. Educational researchers and practitioners more often than not hold unrealistic images of neuroscience, some naively positive and others blindly negative. Neuroscientist looking at how the brain reacts and changes during mental tasks involving reading or mathematics usually discuss education as some constant and undifferentiated "social environment" of the brain, either assuming it to be a "black box" or evoking an image of perfect schooling and full access to it. In this review, we claim that a more productive and realistic relationship between neuroscience and the comparative study of education can be thought about in terms of the hypothesis that formal education is having a significant role in the cognitive and neurological development of human populations around the world. We review research that supports this hypothesis and implications for future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-165
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Perspectives on Education and Society
Volume25
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

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