The services paradigm

Who can you trust?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

New technologies such as software as a service and service oriented architectures have emerged and are growing at a phenomenal rate. A new kind of physics using new approaches, both mathematical and nonmathematical is needed to help understand and communicate about complex systems and create trust. Engineers and scientists generally depend on comprehensive and universal mathematical equations that describe the physical properties and interactions of electromechanical, optical, hydro and thermodynamic, and other systems. Jeff Voas and Keith Miller have attempted to build models to manage trust expectations for processes and software. Their approaches incorporate one or more of the three system views of software including, processes, people, and products. A system must be reliable, fault tolerant, safe, secure, available, good in testability and maintainability in order to achieve trust within the software programmers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)58-61
Number of pages4
JournalIT Professional
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

Fingerprint

Maintainability
Service oriented architecture (SOA)
Large scale systems
Physics
Physical properties
Thermodynamics
Engineers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

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title = "The services paradigm: Who can you trust?",
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The services paradigm : Who can you trust? / Voas, Jeff; Laplante, Phillip A.

In: IT Professional, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.05.2007, p. 58-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T2 - Who can you trust?

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AU - Laplante, Phillip A.

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