The socialization of autonomy and relatedness: Sequential verbal exchanges in Japanese and U.S. mother-preschooler dyads

Tracy A. Dennis, Makram Talih, Pamela M. Cole, Carolyn Zahn-Waxler, Ichiro Mizuta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite documented cross-cultural variability in autonomy and relatedness, relatively little is known about how these characteristics of self are socialized. This study, a secondary analysis (Dennis et al., 2002), explored this question by examining sequential verbal exchanges between Japanese and U.S. mothers and children during play and a challenging wait (N = 60, M age = 55.8 months, SD = 4.9). The likelihood that mothers would contingently encourage child autonomy or relatedness by matching, responding positively, or reducing directives was tested. There was greater encouragement of relatedness among Japanese mothers but few cultural differences in encouraging autonomy. Effects depended on the context of interaction, with greater cultural differences during the challenging wait. Culturally distinct gender effects also emerged: U.S. mothers bolstered girls' autonomy and showed consistent encouragement of boys' relatedness whereas Japanese mothers bolstered autonomy in boys only. Implications for cross-cultural patterns in the socialization of self are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)729-749
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Psychology
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007

Fingerprint

Socialization
dyad
socialization
autonomy
Mothers
cultural difference
secondary analysis
gender
interaction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Dennis, Tracy A. ; Talih, Makram ; Cole, Pamela M. ; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn ; Mizuta, Ichiro. / The socialization of autonomy and relatedness : Sequential verbal exchanges in Japanese and U.S. mother-preschooler dyads. In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. 2007 ; Vol. 38, No. 6. pp. 729-749.
@article{771b4004b9ac41aca6f3c9e6eec09d61,
title = "The socialization of autonomy and relatedness: Sequential verbal exchanges in Japanese and U.S. mother-preschooler dyads",
abstract = "Despite documented cross-cultural variability in autonomy and relatedness, relatively little is known about how these characteristics of self are socialized. This study, a secondary analysis (Dennis et al., 2002), explored this question by examining sequential verbal exchanges between Japanese and U.S. mothers and children during play and a challenging wait (N = 60, M age = 55.8 months, SD = 4.9). The likelihood that mothers would contingently encourage child autonomy or relatedness by matching, responding positively, or reducing directives was tested. There was greater encouragement of relatedness among Japanese mothers but few cultural differences in encouraging autonomy. Effects depended on the context of interaction, with greater cultural differences during the challenging wait. Culturally distinct gender effects also emerged: U.S. mothers bolstered girls' autonomy and showed consistent encouragement of boys' relatedness whereas Japanese mothers bolstered autonomy in boys only. Implications for cross-cultural patterns in the socialization of self are discussed.",
author = "Dennis, {Tracy A.} and Makram Talih and Cole, {Pamela M.} and Carolyn Zahn-Waxler and Ichiro Mizuta",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0022022107308993",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "729--749",
journal = "Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology",
issn = "0022-0221",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "6",

}

The socialization of autonomy and relatedness : Sequential verbal exchanges in Japanese and U.S. mother-preschooler dyads. / Dennis, Tracy A.; Talih, Makram; Cole, Pamela M.; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; Mizuta, Ichiro.

In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Vol. 38, No. 6, 01.11.2007, p. 729-749.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The socialization of autonomy and relatedness

T2 - Sequential verbal exchanges in Japanese and U.S. mother-preschooler dyads

AU - Dennis, Tracy A.

AU - Talih, Makram

AU - Cole, Pamela M.

AU - Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn

AU - Mizuta, Ichiro

PY - 2007/11/1

Y1 - 2007/11/1

N2 - Despite documented cross-cultural variability in autonomy and relatedness, relatively little is known about how these characteristics of self are socialized. This study, a secondary analysis (Dennis et al., 2002), explored this question by examining sequential verbal exchanges between Japanese and U.S. mothers and children during play and a challenging wait (N = 60, M age = 55.8 months, SD = 4.9). The likelihood that mothers would contingently encourage child autonomy or relatedness by matching, responding positively, or reducing directives was tested. There was greater encouragement of relatedness among Japanese mothers but few cultural differences in encouraging autonomy. Effects depended on the context of interaction, with greater cultural differences during the challenging wait. Culturally distinct gender effects also emerged: U.S. mothers bolstered girls' autonomy and showed consistent encouragement of boys' relatedness whereas Japanese mothers bolstered autonomy in boys only. Implications for cross-cultural patterns in the socialization of self are discussed.

AB - Despite documented cross-cultural variability in autonomy and relatedness, relatively little is known about how these characteristics of self are socialized. This study, a secondary analysis (Dennis et al., 2002), explored this question by examining sequential verbal exchanges between Japanese and U.S. mothers and children during play and a challenging wait (N = 60, M age = 55.8 months, SD = 4.9). The likelihood that mothers would contingently encourage child autonomy or relatedness by matching, responding positively, or reducing directives was tested. There was greater encouragement of relatedness among Japanese mothers but few cultural differences in encouraging autonomy. Effects depended on the context of interaction, with greater cultural differences during the challenging wait. Culturally distinct gender effects also emerged: U.S. mothers bolstered girls' autonomy and showed consistent encouragement of boys' relatedness whereas Japanese mothers bolstered autonomy in boys only. Implications for cross-cultural patterns in the socialization of self are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=35348863011&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=35348863011&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0022022107308993

DO - 10.1177/0022022107308993

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:35348863011

VL - 38

SP - 729

EP - 749

JO - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology

JF - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology

SN - 0022-0221

IS - 6

ER -