The sound of music: Constructing science as sociocultural practices through oral and written discourse

Gregory John Kelly, Catherine Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

142 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, we examine the oral and written discourse processes in a high school physics class and how these discourse processes are related to sociocultural practices in scientific communities. Our theoretical framework is based on sociological and anthropological studies of scientific communities and ethnographies of classroom life. We review the use of discourse analysis as a methodological orientation in science education and provide a logic-of-inquiry framing how we used discourse analysis in our ethnographic research. Our ethnographic analysis showed that, through students' participation in creating scientific papers on the physics of sound, their appropriation of scientific discourse was related to the framing activities of the teachers and the social practices established over time in the classroom. Our textual analysis of the student papers focused on how they used evidence to make claims. We explore the lessons learned from participating in the classroom of these students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)883-915
Number of pages33
JournalJournal of Research in Science Teaching
Volume36
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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music
scientific community
discourse analysis
classroom
physics
discourse
science
student
ethnography
participation
teacher
school
evidence
education
time

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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The sound of music : Constructing science as sociocultural practices through oral and written discourse. / Kelly, Gregory John; Chen, Catherine.

In: Journal of Research in Science Teaching, Vol. 36, No. 8, 01.01.1999, p. 883-915.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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