The State of the Reward Comparison Hypothesis: Theoretical Comment on Huang and Hsiao (2008)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rats avoid intake of a gustatory cue following pairings with a drug of abuse, such as morphine or cocaine. Despite the well-established rewarding properties of these drugs, the reduction in intake of the taste cue has been interpreted as a conditioned taste aversion for decades. In 1997, I proposed the reward comparison hypothesis suggesting that rats avoided intake of the drug-associated taste cue because the value of the taste cue pales in comparison to the highly rewarding drug of abuse expected in the near future. In this issue of Behavioral Neuroscience, A.C.W. Huang and S. Hsiao (2008) challenge the reward comparison hypothesis by showing parallels between amphetamine and LiCl-induced suppression of CS intake. This commentary addresses the current state of the reward comparison hypothesis in the context of the experiments completed by Huang and Hsiao and their new task-dependent drug effects hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1383-1390
Number of pages8
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume122
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

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Reward
Cues
Street Drugs
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Amphetamine
Neurosciences
Cocaine
Morphine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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abstract = "Rats avoid intake of a gustatory cue following pairings with a drug of abuse, such as morphine or cocaine. Despite the well-established rewarding properties of these drugs, the reduction in intake of the taste cue has been interpreted as a conditioned taste aversion for decades. In 1997, I proposed the reward comparison hypothesis suggesting that rats avoided intake of the drug-associated taste cue because the value of the taste cue pales in comparison to the highly rewarding drug of abuse expected in the near future. In this issue of Behavioral Neuroscience, A.C.W. Huang and S. Hsiao (2008) challenge the reward comparison hypothesis by showing parallels between amphetamine and LiCl-induced suppression of CS intake. This commentary addresses the current state of the reward comparison hypothesis in the context of the experiments completed by Huang and Hsiao and their new task-dependent drug effects hypothesis.",
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The State of the Reward Comparison Hypothesis : Theoretical Comment on Huang and Hsiao (2008). / Grigson-Kennedy, Patricia "Sue".

In: Behavioral Neuroscience, Vol. 122, No. 6, 01.12.2008, p. 1383-1390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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