The sternocleidomastoid myocutaneous "patch esophagoplasty" for cervical esophageal stricture

Shelley S. Noland, John Ingraham, Gordon K. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Esophageal strictures may be caused by many etiologies. Patients suffer from dysphagia and many are tube-feed dependent. Cervical esophageal reconstruction is challenging for the plastic surgeon, and although there are reports utilizing chest wall flaps or even free flaps, the use of a sternocleidomastoid (SCM) myocutaneous flap provides an ideal reconstruction in select patients who require noncircumferential "patch" cervical esophagoplasty. We present two cases of esophageal reconstruction in which we demonstrate our technique for harvesting and insetting the SCM flap, with particular emphasis on design of the skin paddle and elucidation of the vascular anatomy. We believe that the SCM flap is simple, reliable, convenient, and technically easy to perform. There is minimal donor site morbidity with no functional loss. The SCM myocutaneous flap is a viable option for reconstructing partial esophageal defects and obviates the need to perform staged procedures or more extensive operations such as free tissue transfer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-322
Number of pages5
JournalMicrosurgery
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

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Esophagoplasty
Esophageal Stenosis
Myocutaneous Flap
Free Tissue Flaps
Thoracic Wall
Deglutition Disorders
Blood Vessels
Anatomy
Tissue Donors
Morbidity
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

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The sternocleidomastoid myocutaneous "patch esophagoplasty" for cervical esophageal stricture. / Noland, Shelley S.; Ingraham, John; Lee, Gordon K.

In: Microsurgery, Vol. 31, No. 4, 01.05.2011, p. 318-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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