The sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere.

O. B. Toon, James Kasting, R. P. Turco, M. S. Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A one-dimensional photochemical model is used to simulate the sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere. CS2 concentrations reported over the oceans are an order of magnitude higher than those expected on the basis of a 0.5 Tg S yr-1 source estimated from water column measurements; the discrepancy may reflect continental contaminants. We require a sink for OCS of magnitude 1-4 Tg S yr-1 in order to balance its budget. Most of the SO2 in the marine atmosphere apparently derives from oxidation of DMS, which has an estimated source of about 40 Tg S yr-1. The main loss process for DMS is reaction with OH. SO2 concentrations increase with altitude in the marine troposphere, while sulfate concentrations decrease with altitude.-from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)943-963
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume92
Issue numberD1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

Fingerprint

marine atmosphere
sulfur cycle
dimethylsulfide
Troposphere
Sulfur
Sulfates
sulfur
Impurities
atmospheres
Oxidation
cycles
Water
troposphere
sulfates
water column
oceans
oxidation
sulfate
sinks
budgets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

Toon, O. B. ; Kasting, James ; Turco, R. P. ; Liu, M. S. / The sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere. In: Journal of Geophysical Research. 1987 ; Vol. 92, No. D1. pp. 943-963.
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The sulfur cycle in the marine atmosphere. / Toon, O. B.; Kasting, James; Turco, R. P.; Liu, M. S.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 92, No. D1, 01.01.1987, p. 943-963.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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