The Supporting a Teen's Effective Entry to the Roadway (STEER) Program: Feasibility and Preliminary Support for a Psychosocial Intervention for Teenage Drivers With ADHD

Gregory A. Fabiano, Kevin Hulme, Stuart Linke, Chris Nelson-Tuttle, Meaghan Pariseau, Brian Gangloff, Kemper Lewis, William E. Pelham, Daniel A. Waschbusch, James G. Waxmonsky, Matthew Gormley, Shradha Gera, Melina Buck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Teenage drivers with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at considerable risk for negative driving outcomes, including traffic citations, accidents, and injuries. Presently, no efficacious psychosocial interventions exist for teenage drivers with ADHD. The Supporting a Teen's Effective Entry to the Roadway (STEER) program is a multicomponent intervention that was developed to help families with a teenager with ADHD negotiate the transition independent driving. The present report includes outcomes from 7 teens with ADHD who enrolled in the 8-week program. Using a multiple baseline design across participants, teens had driving behavior continuously monitored using on-board monitors that measured driving behaviors (i.e., hard breaking, speed), and the parents and teens reported on driving-related impairment each week. Results indicated promising effects across participants, though there were individual differences in treatment response within and across participants and measures. The STEER program was viewed as acceptable to participants as all families completed the STEER program and reported it to be a palatable intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-280
Number of pages14
JournalCognitive and Behavioral Practice
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2011

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Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Traffic Accidents
Individuality
Parents
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Fabiano, Gregory A. ; Hulme, Kevin ; Linke, Stuart ; Nelson-Tuttle, Chris ; Pariseau, Meaghan ; Gangloff, Brian ; Lewis, Kemper ; Pelham, William E. ; Waschbusch, Daniel A. ; Waxmonsky, James G. ; Gormley, Matthew ; Gera, Shradha ; Buck, Melina. / The Supporting a Teen's Effective Entry to the Roadway (STEER) Program : Feasibility and Preliminary Support for a Psychosocial Intervention for Teenage Drivers With ADHD. In: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice. 2011 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 267-280.
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The Supporting a Teen's Effective Entry to the Roadway (STEER) Program : Feasibility and Preliminary Support for a Psychosocial Intervention for Teenage Drivers With ADHD. / Fabiano, Gregory A.; Hulme, Kevin; Linke, Stuart; Nelson-Tuttle, Chris; Pariseau, Meaghan; Gangloff, Brian; Lewis, Kemper; Pelham, William E.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Gormley, Matthew; Gera, Shradha; Buck, Melina.

In: Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Vol. 18, No. 2, 01.05.2011, p. 267-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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