The suppressive effects of sucrose and cocaine, but not lithium chloride, are greater in lewis than in fischer rats: Evidence for the reward comparison hypothesis

Patricia S. Grigson, Christopher S. Freet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Rats suppress intake of a saccharin conditioned stimulus (CS) when it is paired with an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US), an appetitive US, or a drug of abuse such as morphine or cocaine. It is unclear, however, whether the reduction in intake induced by these drugs is mediated by their aversive or their rewarding properties. The present set of experiments addressed this question by comparing the suppressive effects of a known aversive US (LiCl), a known reinforcing US (sucrose), and a drug of abuse (cocaine) in two strains of rats (i.e., Lewis and Fischer 344 rats) that differ in their preference for rewarding stimuli. The results show that, although both strains readily acquired a LiCl-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA), the suppressive effects of sucrose and cocaine were robust in the drug-preferring Lewis rats and absent in the Fischer rats. These data argue against a CTA account and in favor of the reward comparison hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-363
Number of pages11
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume114
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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