The Test-Optional Movement at America’s Selective Liberal Arts Colleges

A Boon for Equity or Something Else?

Andrew S. Belasco, Kelly Rosinger, James C. Hearn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The test-optional movement in the United States emerged largely in response to criticism of standardized admissions tests as inadequate and potentially biased measures of postsecondary promise. Although anecdotal reports suggest that test-optional policies have improved campus diversity, empirical research has not yet confirmed this claim. Consequently, this study employs quasi-experimental techniques to assess the relationship between test-optional policy implementation and subsequent growth in the proportion of low-income and minority students enrolling at adopting liberal arts colleges. It also examines whether test-optional policies increase institutional standing through greater application numbers and higher reported Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores. Results show that, on average, test-optional policies enhance the perceived selectivity, rather than the diversity, of participating institutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-223
Number of pages18
JournalEducational Evaluation and Policy Analysis
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 4 2015

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equity
art
scholastic aptitude
aptitude test
policy implementation
empirical research
low income
criticism
minority
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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The Test-Optional Movement at America’s Selective Liberal Arts Colleges : A Boon for Equity or Something Else? / Belasco, Andrew S.; Rosinger, Kelly; Hearn, James C.

In: Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, Vol. 37, No. 2, 04.06.2015, p. 206-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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