The timing of multiple retrieval events can alter GluR1 phosphorylation and the requirement for protein synthesis in fear memory reconsolidation

Timothy J. Jarome, Janine L. Kwapis, Craig T. Werner, Ryan G. Parsons, Georgette M. Gafford, Fred J. Helmstetter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Numerous studies have indicated that maintaining a fear memory after retrieval requires de novo protein synthesis. However, no study to date has examined how the temporal dynamics of repeated retrieval events affect this protein synthesis requirement. The present study varied the timing of a second retrieval of an established auditory fear memory and followed this second retrieval with infusions of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (ANI) into the basolateral amygdala. Results indicated that the memory-impairing effects of ANI were not observed when the second retrieval occurred soon after the first (within 1 h), and that the inhibitor gradually regained effectiveness as the retrieval episodes were spaced further apart. Additionally, if the second of the closely timed retrievals was omitted prior to ANI infusions, long-term memory deficits were observed, suggesting that the altered effectiveness of ANI was due specifically to the second retrieval event. Further experiments revealed that the second retrieval was not associated with a change in Zif268 protein expression but did produce a rapid and persistent dephosphorylation of GluR1 receptors at Ser845, an AMPAR trafficking site known to regulate the stability of GluR2 lacking AMPARs, which have been shown to be important in memory updating. This suggests that the precise timing of multiple CS presentations during the reconsolidation window may affect the destabilization state of the memory trace.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)300-306
Number of pages7
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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