The trajectory of coparenting satisfaction in African American families: The impact of sociocultural stressors and supports

Elizabeth M. Riina, Susan M. McHale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Based in family systems and ecological perspectives, this study expands the scope of coparenting research by: (a) charting the trajectory of coparenting satisfaction for mothers and fathers in two-parent African American families during their offspring's adolescence, and (b) examining the role of sociocultural stressors and supports for coparenting satisfaction. Participants were 192 African American mothers and fathers who reported on their coparenting satisfaction and both economic and cultural stressors (economic strain and racial discrimination), and supports (socioeconomic resources and religiosity). Longitudinal growth curves revealed declines in coparenting satisfaction for fathers but not mothers over the course of offspring's adolescence. Findings were generally consistent with hypotheses that stressors were negatively, and supports, positively, related to average levels of coparenting satisfaction. Findings for racial discrimination and income differed by parent and highlighted gender dynamics within couple relationships. We discuss implications for understanding of normative family processes in African American families as these unfold within both family and broader sociocultural contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)896-905
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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