The transcriptional response of Aedes aegypti with variable extrinsic incubation periods for dengue virus

Cassandra Koh, Scott L. Allen, Rosemarie I. Herbert, Elizabeth A. McGraw, Stephen F. Chenoweth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dengue fever is the most prevalent arboviral disease globally. Dengue virus is transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. One measure of the mosquito’s efficiency as a vector is the extrinsic incubation period (EIP), which is the time between the ingestion of viremic blood and the emergence of virions in the saliva. The longer it takes virus to infect the midgut and traverse to the saliva, the fewer opportunities the mosquito will have to transmit the pathogen over its lifetime. We have shown previously that EIP for dengue virus is highly heritable and that it is negatively correlated with vector lifespan. Here, we examined the transcriptional profiles for mosquitoes that varied in their EIP phenotype and identified pathways associated with either short or long EIP. We found that mosquitoes with short EIP have less active immune responses but higher levels of protein translation and calcium ion homeostasis and that mosquitoes with longer EIP may have slower metabolism. These findings indicate a complex interplay between calcium ion distribution, ribosome biogenesis, and metabolism and reveal potential pathways that could be modified to slow the rate of viral progression and hence limit lifetime transmission capability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3141-3151
Number of pages11
JournalGenome biology and evolution
Volume10
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

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