The Two Faces of Cincinnatus: A Rhetorical Theory of the State of Exception

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article offers a rhetorical theory of what Giorgio Agamben has called the “state of exception” through a genealogy of the figure of Cincinnatus. In classical Rome, Cincinnatus was named dictator not once, but twice; first to save the city from invaders, and second to put down a popular, democratic uprising. Here we see the two sides of exception, or what I call the two faces of Cincinnatus: enemyship, and sovereign violence. These two faces are linked by an anti-democratic logic that is premised on the will of “the people,” as becomes clear in the counter-revolutionary writings of the founders of the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-64
Number of pages12
JournalAdvances in the History of Rhetoric
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

theory of the state
genealogy
violence
Rome
Dictator
State of Exception
Genealogy
Uprising
Giorgio Agamben
Logic
Rhetorical Theory
Revolution
Violence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

@article{9ac4987d29af4af3a60e33a19fce4ef3,
title = "The Two Faces of Cincinnatus: A Rhetorical Theory of the State of Exception",
abstract = "This article offers a rhetorical theory of what Giorgio Agamben has called the “state of exception” through a genealogy of the figure of Cincinnatus. In classical Rome, Cincinnatus was named dictator not once, but twice; first to save the city from invaders, and second to put down a popular, democratic uprising. Here we see the two sides of exception, or what I call the two faces of Cincinnatus: enemyship, and sovereign violence. These two faces are linked by an anti-democratic logic that is premised on the will of “the people,” as becomes clear in the counter-revolutionary writings of the founders of the United States.",
author = "Jeremy Engels",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/15362426.2014.886930",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "53--64",
journal = "Advances in the History of Rhetoric",
issn = "1536-2426",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

The Two Faces of Cincinnatus : A Rhetorical Theory of the State of Exception. / Engels, Jeremy.

In: Advances in the History of Rhetoric, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 53-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Two Faces of Cincinnatus

T2 - A Rhetorical Theory of the State of Exception

AU - Engels, Jeremy

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - This article offers a rhetorical theory of what Giorgio Agamben has called the “state of exception” through a genealogy of the figure of Cincinnatus. In classical Rome, Cincinnatus was named dictator not once, but twice; first to save the city from invaders, and second to put down a popular, democratic uprising. Here we see the two sides of exception, or what I call the two faces of Cincinnatus: enemyship, and sovereign violence. These two faces are linked by an anti-democratic logic that is premised on the will of “the people,” as becomes clear in the counter-revolutionary writings of the founders of the United States.

AB - This article offers a rhetorical theory of what Giorgio Agamben has called the “state of exception” through a genealogy of the figure of Cincinnatus. In classical Rome, Cincinnatus was named dictator not once, but twice; first to save the city from invaders, and second to put down a popular, democratic uprising. Here we see the two sides of exception, or what I call the two faces of Cincinnatus: enemyship, and sovereign violence. These two faces are linked by an anti-democratic logic that is premised on the will of “the people,” as becomes clear in the counter-revolutionary writings of the founders of the United States.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925944125&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925944125&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15362426.2014.886930

DO - 10.1080/15362426.2014.886930

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84925944125

VL - 17

SP - 53

EP - 64

JO - Advances in the History of Rhetoric

JF - Advances in the History of Rhetoric

SN - 1536-2426

IS - 1

ER -