The use of a pneumatic intermittent impulse compression device in the treatment of calcaneus fractures

M. S. Myerson, Paul Juliano, J. D. Koman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine the effects of intermittent compression on foot swelling, intracompartmental pressures, and hospital stay associated with acute calcaneus fractures, we retrospectively reviewed the records of 55 patients between January 1990 and July 1992 whose management profile included preoperative use of an intermittent compression foot pump and surgical treatment by open reduction and internal fixation. Average times were: injury to admission, 6.04 days; admission to surgery, 1.35 days; and surgery to discharge, 3.38 days. Hospital stay averaged 4.73 days. In 27 patients with suspected compartmental ischemia, admission and preoperative pressures in three compartments were averaged and compared: 18.22 and 3.81 mm Hg, respectively (p < 0.001). The authors concluded that the intermittent compression pump appears to rapidly reduce swelling of the foot and decrease elevated compartment pressures associated with calcaneus fractures, which may play a role in decreasing hospital stay.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)721-725
Number of pages5
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume165
Issue number10
StatePublished - Nov 9 2000

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Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Devices
Calcaneus
Foot
Length of Stay
Pressure
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Therapeutics
Ischemia
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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The use of a pneumatic intermittent impulse compression device in the treatment of calcaneus fractures. / Myerson, M. S.; Juliano, Paul; Koman, J. D.

In: Military medicine, Vol. 165, No. 10, 09.11.2000, p. 721-725.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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