The use of artificial impoundments by two amphibian species in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area

James Thomas Julian, Craig D. Snyder, John A. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We compared breeding activity of Ambystoma maculatum (Spotted Salamander) and Rana sylvatica (Wood Frog) in artificial impoundments to patterns in natural wetlands over a three-year period in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Rana sylvatica were 5.6 times more likely to use natural bodies of water for breeding than artificial impoundments, while A. maculatum were 2.7 times more likely to use natural bodies of water. Both species were approximately 9 times more likely to breed in fishless bodies of water than in waters with predatory fish. Ambystoma maculatum were 6 times more likely to breed in wetlands with more stable seasonal hydroperiods, while R. sylvatica were only 2 times more likely to do so. We conclude that the high likelihood of fish presence in impoundments was the primary explanation for why both species were less likely to use impoundments than natural wetlands, while the tendency of A. maculatum to avoid natural wetlands with shorter hydroperiods explained why differences in use between pond types was more pronounced for R. sylvatica.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)459-468
Number of pages10
JournalNortheastern Naturalist
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

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recreation areas
impoundment
amphibian
amphibians
wetlands
wetland
body water
hydroperiod
Ambystoma
water
breeding
breeds
fish
salamanders and newts
frog
pond
Rana sylvatica
recreation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology

Cite this

Julian, James Thomas ; Snyder, Craig D. ; Young, John A. / The use of artificial impoundments by two amphibian species in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. In: Northeastern Naturalist. 2006 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 459-468.
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The use of artificial impoundments by two amphibian species in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. / Julian, James Thomas; Snyder, Craig D.; Young, John A.

In: Northeastern Naturalist, Vol. 13, No. 4, 2006, p. 459-468.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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