The use of bacteriophages of the family Cystoviridae as surrogates for H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in persistence and inactivation studies

Noreen J. Adcock, Eugene W. Rice, Mano Sivaganesan, Justin D. Brown, David E. Stallknecht, David E. Swayne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two bacteriophages, φ6 and φ8, were investigated as potential surrogates for H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus in persistence and chlorine inactivation studies in water. In the persistence studies, φ6 and φ8 remained infectious at least as long as the H5N1 viruses at both 17 and 28°C in fresh water, but results varied in salinated water. The bacteriophage φ6 also exhibited a slightly higher chlorine resistance than that of the H5N1 viruses. Based upon these findings, the bacteriophages may have potential for use as surrogates in persistence and inactivation studies in fresh water.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1362-1366
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Environmental Science and Health - Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering
Volume44
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering

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