The Use of Biomarkers After Inflicted Traumatic Brain Injury: Insight into Etiology, Pathophysiology, and Biochemistry

Rachel Pardes Berger, Kent Hymel, Wei Min Gao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Inflicted traumatic brain injury (iTBI) is the most common cause of severe brain injury in infants. Proper diagnosis is difficult even for experienced emergency department physicians. Misdiagnosis is common and can have catastrophic consequences for patients and society. After iTBI, biochemical markers are released from brain tissue and pass into the cerebrospinal fluid and serum. Measuring the concentrations of these markers may help to identify brain injury that could otherwise be missed. Biomarkers may also be able to help differentiate noninflicted TBI from iTBI, assist in the timing of iTBI, improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of iTBI, and predict outcome after iTBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)186-193
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Emergency Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The Use of Biomarkers After Inflicted Traumatic Brain Injury: Insight into Etiology, Pathophysiology, and Biochemistry'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this