The Use of Decision Analysis for Organizational Design: Reorganizing a Community Hospital

Reuben R. Mcdaniel, James B. Thomas, Donde P. Ashmos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Organizational design is presented as a decision process, with specific structures seen as providing alternative choices. To illustrate this, the authors present the case of a major metropolitan hospital that used the process to coordinate service delivery (nursing care versus patient care) and servicefocus (product oriented versus function oriented). Through interviews with more than 40 hospital administrators and staff, the authors created a list of 20 attributes, and used simple multi-attribute utility analysis to generate six design alternatives. The decision makers unanimously chose one alternative, even though potential for significant conflict existed because of differing values and objectives. The authors find decision analytic techniques useful for both the problem formulation and for generating and evaluating structural alternatives, and conclude that in this case consensus was facilitated by the decision process used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)337-350
Number of pages14
JournalThe Journal of Applied Behavioral Science
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

Fingerprint

Hospital Administrators
Decision Support Techniques
Urban Hospitals
Community Hospital
Nursing Care
Patient Care
Research Design
Interviews

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

@article{7026bbccb63145c08f72ed0325cc25e0,
title = "The Use of Decision Analysis for Organizational Design: Reorganizing a Community Hospital",
abstract = "Organizational design is presented as a decision process, with specific structures seen as providing alternative choices. To illustrate this, the authors present the case of a major metropolitan hospital that used the process to coordinate service delivery (nursing care versus patient care) and servicefocus (product oriented versus function oriented). Through interviews with more than 40 hospital administrators and staff, the authors created a list of 20 attributes, and used simple multi-attribute utility analysis to generate six design alternatives. The decision makers unanimously chose one alternative, even though potential for significant conflict existed because of differing values and objectives. The authors find decision analytic techniques useful for both the problem formulation and for generating and evaluating structural alternatives, and conclude that in this case consensus was facilitated by the decision process used.",
author = "Mcdaniel, {Reuben R.} and Thomas, {James B.} and Ashmos, {Donde P.}",
year = "1987",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/002188638702300304",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "337--350",
journal = "The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science",
issn = "0021-8863",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

The Use of Decision Analysis for Organizational Design : Reorganizing a Community Hospital. / Mcdaniel, Reuben R.; Thomas, James B.; Ashmos, Donde P.

In: The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.01.1987, p. 337-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Use of Decision Analysis for Organizational Design

T2 - Reorganizing a Community Hospital

AU - Mcdaniel, Reuben R.

AU - Thomas, James B.

AU - Ashmos, Donde P.

PY - 1987/1/1

Y1 - 1987/1/1

N2 - Organizational design is presented as a decision process, with specific structures seen as providing alternative choices. To illustrate this, the authors present the case of a major metropolitan hospital that used the process to coordinate service delivery (nursing care versus patient care) and servicefocus (product oriented versus function oriented). Through interviews with more than 40 hospital administrators and staff, the authors created a list of 20 attributes, and used simple multi-attribute utility analysis to generate six design alternatives. The decision makers unanimously chose one alternative, even though potential for significant conflict existed because of differing values and objectives. The authors find decision analytic techniques useful for both the problem formulation and for generating and evaluating structural alternatives, and conclude that in this case consensus was facilitated by the decision process used.

AB - Organizational design is presented as a decision process, with specific structures seen as providing alternative choices. To illustrate this, the authors present the case of a major metropolitan hospital that used the process to coordinate service delivery (nursing care versus patient care) and servicefocus (product oriented versus function oriented). Through interviews with more than 40 hospital administrators and staff, the authors created a list of 20 attributes, and used simple multi-attribute utility analysis to generate six design alternatives. The decision makers unanimously chose one alternative, even though potential for significant conflict existed because of differing values and objectives. The authors find decision analytic techniques useful for both the problem formulation and for generating and evaluating structural alternatives, and conclude that in this case consensus was facilitated by the decision process used.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023506414&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023506414&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/002188638702300304

DO - 10.1177/002188638702300304

M3 - Article

C2 - 10284964

AN - SCOPUS:0023506414

VL - 23

SP - 337

EP - 350

JO - The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science

JF - The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science

SN - 0021-8863

IS - 3

ER -