The value proposition for graduate education of emerging nurse leaders: Immediate benefit to organizations

Bonnie Pilon, Terri D. Crutcher, Susie Leming-Lee, Richard Watters, Kelly A. Wolgast, Debra Arnow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The economic impact of higher education on the individual has been widely documented, with benefits measured in terms of lifetime earning power, accumulation of household wealth, lower unemployment, access to healthcare coverage, and overall better health across all ages and income levels.1-6 The economic impact within the workplace, to the employer, is less precisely defined. Overall benefits include a better prepared workforce, which can lead to increased economic benefit to the employer and to society as a whole. Specific benefits related to investing in the education of current and future health systems nurse leaders may have an early, as well as a sustained, impact on the organization. Using case studies, this report explores the beneficial economic and quality impact on healthcare agencies and institutions during, as well as after, the completion of degree requirements when emerging nurse leaders pursue graduate education in health systems management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-85
Number of pages5
JournalNurse Leader
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Leadership and Management

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