The variability in running gait caused by force plate targeting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the influence of force plate targeting, via stride length adjustments, on the magnitude and consistency of ground reaction force and segment angle profiles of the stance phase of human running. Seven male subjects (height, 1.77 m ± 0.081; mass, 72.4 kg ± 7.52; age range, 23 to 32 years) were asked to run at a mean velocity of 3.2 m · s-1 under three conditions (normal, short, and long strides). Four trials were completed for each condition. For each trial, the ground reaction forces were measured and the orientations of the foot, shank, and thigh computed. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) between the coefficients of variation of ground reaction force and segment angle profiles under the three conditions, so these profiles were produced consistently. Peak active vertical ground reaction forces, their timings, and segment angles at foot off were not significantly different across conditions. In contrast, significant differences between conditions were found for peak vertical impact forces and their timings, and for the three lower limb segment angles at the start of force plate contact. These results have implications for human gait studies, which require subjects to target the force plate. Targeting may be acceptable depending on the variables to be analyzed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-83
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Biomechanics
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Gait
Running
Foot
Thigh
Lower Extremity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

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The variability in running gait caused by force plate targeting. / Challis, John Henry.

In: Journal of Applied Biomechanics, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.01.2001, p. 77-83.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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