The victim-offender relationship and calling the police in assaults

Richard B. Felson, Steven F. Messner, Anthony Hoskin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The revised National Crime Victimization Survey is used to examine the effects of the victim's relationship to the offender on whether assaults are reported to the police by either the victim or by third parties. The results indicate that the offender-victim relationship affects third-party but not victim reporting. The former effect occurs in part because third parties are unlikely to witness assaults involving people in ongoing relationships, particularly couples, and in part because third parties are reluctant to report minor assaults (i.e., those assaults that involve a threat but no actual attack and no weapon). We discuss possible explanations for why no effect of relationship on victim reporting was found.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)931-947
Number of pages17
JournalCriminology
Volume37
Issue number4
StatePublished - Nov 1 1999

Fingerprint

offender-victim relationship
Police
assault
police
Weapons
Crime Victims
Crime
weapon
victimization
witness
offender
offense
threat

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

Felson, Richard B. ; Messner, Steven F. ; Hoskin, Anthony. / The victim-offender relationship and calling the police in assaults. In: Criminology. 1999 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 931-947.
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Felson, RB, Messner, SF & Hoskin, A 1999, 'The victim-offender relationship and calling the police in assaults', Criminology, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 931-947.

The victim-offender relationship and calling the police in assaults. / Felson, Richard B.; Messner, Steven F.; Hoskin, Anthony.

In: Criminology, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.11.1999, p. 931-947.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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