The waters of rebirth: The eighteenth century and transoceanic protestant christianity

Anthony Roeber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a provocatively titled 2005 book, Mark Noll and Carolyn Nystrom wondered Is the Reformation Over? While not presuming to answer their query, the present essay argues that a self-understanding of European Protestants inherited from the Reformation had to die in the 1740s in the process of giving birth to the rapidly spreading version of western Christianity that became known as evangelicalism. Protestants, of both the radical and magisterial sort had cherished since the sixteenth century a sense of themselves as the true, ancient, and apostolic church. The Reformation, however, in its theological, as well as its socio-political and economic dimensions, had long left its heirs no settled comprehensive system, only with many unresolved questions of principle and usage, not least in decisions relating to the body.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-76
Number of pages37
JournalChurch History
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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reformation
Christianity
eighteenth century
water
sixteenth century
church
economics
Water
Rebirth
Reformation
Protestant Christianity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • History
  • Religious studies

Cite this

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The waters of rebirth : The eighteenth century and transoceanic protestant christianity. / Roeber, Anthony.

In: Church History, Vol. 79, No. 1, 01.03.2010, p. 40-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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