The way, multimodality of ritual symbols, and social change: Reading confucius’s analects as a rhetoric

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most rhetorical readings of Confucius’s Analects have focused on his views on eloquence, reflecting an insuppressible impulse among comparative rhetoricians to match Confucian rhetoric to Greco–Roman rhetorical framework. My reading of the text argues that Confucius was more concerned about the suasory power of the multimodality of ritual symbols than narrowly verbal persuasion. To achieve the Way for restoring social unity and peace, Confucius emphasizes the ritualization of both the self and the others through studying history and performing rituals reflectively. I suggest, as the first Chinese rhetoric par excellence, the Analects shares some similar features with epideictic rhetoric.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)425-448
Number of pages24
JournalRhetoric Society Quarterly
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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multimodality
social change
religious behavior
symbol
rhetoric
persuasion
peace
history

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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The way, multimodality of ritual symbols, and social change : Reading confucius’s analects as a rhetoric. / You, Xiaoye.

In: Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Vol. 36, No. 4, 01.12.2006, p. 425-448.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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