The weight of school entry: Weight gain among Hispanic children of immigrants during the early elementary school years

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND Hispanic children of immigrants are vulnerable to obesity and weigh more than their white peers. Theory suggests that school is a social institution that could foster weight gain among Hispanic children of immigrants and disparities in weight that emerge over time. OBJECTIVE We investigate whether Hispanic children of immigrants gain more weight during school years than whites and whether school year weight gains accumulate and contribute to differences in the weight of Hispanic children of immigrants and whites. METHODS We analyze ECLS-K:2011 kindergarten, first, and second grade data using descriptive statistics and multilevel growth curve models. We also calculate how the accumulation of weight gain during school years and summer breaks contributes to weight disparities between Hispanic children of immigrants and whites by the end of second grade. RESULTS Hispanic children of immigrants gain significantly more weight than white and Hispanic children with US-born parents during the kindergarten school year. The accumulation of weight gain during kindergarten, first, and second grade school years contributes to weight disparities between Hispanic children of immigrants and whites, but not differences between Hispanic and white children with US-born parents. CONCLUSION Hispanic children of immigrants are vulnerable to weight gain during kindergarten. In addition, weight gain during the earliest school years helps to explain emerging ethnic/parental nativity disparities in weight. CONTRIBUTION The paper extends knowledge about negative health assimilation among Hispanic children of immigrants by showing that a primary social institution in children's lives may inadvertently contribute to weight gain and emerging disparities in weight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-120
Number of pages26
JournalDemographic Research
Volume40
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

elementary school
immigrant
school
kindergarten
school grade
social institution
parents
descriptive statistics
assimilation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography

Cite this

@article{d6c91c0e402e478d9681f9f188dd7357,
title = "The weight of school entry: Weight gain among Hispanic children of immigrants during the early elementary school years",
abstract = "BACKGROUND Hispanic children of immigrants are vulnerable to obesity and weigh more than their white peers. Theory suggests that school is a social institution that could foster weight gain among Hispanic children of immigrants and disparities in weight that emerge over time. OBJECTIVE We investigate whether Hispanic children of immigrants gain more weight during school years than whites and whether school year weight gains accumulate and contribute to differences in the weight of Hispanic children of immigrants and whites. METHODS We analyze ECLS-K:2011 kindergarten, first, and second grade data using descriptive statistics and multilevel growth curve models. We also calculate how the accumulation of weight gain during school years and summer breaks contributes to weight disparities between Hispanic children of immigrants and whites by the end of second grade. RESULTS Hispanic children of immigrants gain significantly more weight than white and Hispanic children with US-born parents during the kindergarten school year. The accumulation of weight gain during kindergarten, first, and second grade school years contributes to weight disparities between Hispanic children of immigrants and whites, but not differences between Hispanic and white children with US-born parents. CONCLUSION Hispanic children of immigrants are vulnerable to weight gain during kindergarten. In addition, weight gain during the earliest school years helps to explain emerging ethnic/parental nativity disparities in weight. CONTRIBUTION The paper extends knowledge about negative health assimilation among Hispanic children of immigrants by showing that a primary social institution in children's lives may inadvertently contribute to weight gain and emerging disparities in weight.",
author = "Frisco, {Michelle Lynn} and Erin Baumgartner and {Van Hook}, {Jennifer Lynne}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4054/DEMRES.2019.40.5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "95--120",
journal = "Demographic Research",
issn = "1435-9871",
publisher = "Max-Planck Institute for Demographic Research/Max-Planck-institut fur Demografische Forschung",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The weight of school entry

T2 - Weight gain among Hispanic children of immigrants during the early elementary school years

AU - Frisco, Michelle Lynn

AU - Baumgartner, Erin

AU - Van Hook, Jennifer Lynne

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - BACKGROUND Hispanic children of immigrants are vulnerable to obesity and weigh more than their white peers. Theory suggests that school is a social institution that could foster weight gain among Hispanic children of immigrants and disparities in weight that emerge over time. OBJECTIVE We investigate whether Hispanic children of immigrants gain more weight during school years than whites and whether school year weight gains accumulate and contribute to differences in the weight of Hispanic children of immigrants and whites. METHODS We analyze ECLS-K:2011 kindergarten, first, and second grade data using descriptive statistics and multilevel growth curve models. We also calculate how the accumulation of weight gain during school years and summer breaks contributes to weight disparities between Hispanic children of immigrants and whites by the end of second grade. RESULTS Hispanic children of immigrants gain significantly more weight than white and Hispanic children with US-born parents during the kindergarten school year. The accumulation of weight gain during kindergarten, first, and second grade school years contributes to weight disparities between Hispanic children of immigrants and whites, but not differences between Hispanic and white children with US-born parents. CONCLUSION Hispanic children of immigrants are vulnerable to weight gain during kindergarten. In addition, weight gain during the earliest school years helps to explain emerging ethnic/parental nativity disparities in weight. CONTRIBUTION The paper extends knowledge about negative health assimilation among Hispanic children of immigrants by showing that a primary social institution in children's lives may inadvertently contribute to weight gain and emerging disparities in weight.

AB - BACKGROUND Hispanic children of immigrants are vulnerable to obesity and weigh more than their white peers. Theory suggests that school is a social institution that could foster weight gain among Hispanic children of immigrants and disparities in weight that emerge over time. OBJECTIVE We investigate whether Hispanic children of immigrants gain more weight during school years than whites and whether school year weight gains accumulate and contribute to differences in the weight of Hispanic children of immigrants and whites. METHODS We analyze ECLS-K:2011 kindergarten, first, and second grade data using descriptive statistics and multilevel growth curve models. We also calculate how the accumulation of weight gain during school years and summer breaks contributes to weight disparities between Hispanic children of immigrants and whites by the end of second grade. RESULTS Hispanic children of immigrants gain significantly more weight than white and Hispanic children with US-born parents during the kindergarten school year. The accumulation of weight gain during kindergarten, first, and second grade school years contributes to weight disparities between Hispanic children of immigrants and whites, but not differences between Hispanic and white children with US-born parents. CONCLUSION Hispanic children of immigrants are vulnerable to weight gain during kindergarten. In addition, weight gain during the earliest school years helps to explain emerging ethnic/parental nativity disparities in weight. CONTRIBUTION The paper extends knowledge about negative health assimilation among Hispanic children of immigrants by showing that a primary social institution in children's lives may inadvertently contribute to weight gain and emerging disparities in weight.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064900460&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064900460&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4054/DEMRES.2019.40.5

DO - 10.4054/DEMRES.2019.40.5

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85064900460

VL - 40

SP - 95

EP - 120

JO - Demographic Research

JF - Demographic Research

SN - 1435-9871

ER -