The Weight-Related Eating Questionnaire offers a concise alternative to the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire for measuring eating behaviors related to weight loss

Brittany L. James, Eric Loken, Liane Stevens Roe, Barbara Jean Rolls

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective During a one-year weight loss trial, we compared the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), a valid 51-item measure of restraint, disinhibition, and hunger subscales, with the newer 16-item Weight-Related Eating Questionnaire (WREQ) measuring routine and compensatory restraint and external and emotional eating. Methods Both questionnaires were administered to women with overweight or obesity (n = 186, mean ± SD, age 50 ± 10.6 y, BMI 34 ± 4.2 kg/m2) at five time points. Completion rates were 100% at baseline and Month 1, 94% at Month 3, 83% at Month 6, and 76% at Month 12. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on baseline WREQ data and correlations were calculated between TFEQ and WREQ subscales. Multilevel models evaluated the relationship between each subscale and weight change over time. Results Factor analysis revealed a WREQ structure consistent with previous research, and corresponding subscales on the TFEQ and WREQ were correlated. Lower baseline TFEQ restraint predicted greater weight loss. Across five administrations, TFEQ and WREQ restraint scores were positively related to weight loss (p < 0.01) and TFEQ disinhibition and WREQ external and emotional eating scores were negatively related (p < 0.001). Thus, with one baseline administration, only TFEQ restraint was significantly related to weight change, but multiple administrations showed relationships between all TFEQ and WREQ subscales and weight change. Conclusions The WREQ offers a shorter alternative to the TFEQ when repeatedly assessing eating behaviors related to weight change.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)108-114
Number of pages7
JournalAppetite
Volume116
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Feeding Behavior
Weight Loss
Eating
Weights and Measures
Surveys and Questionnaires
Statistical Factor Analysis
Hunger

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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title = "The Weight-Related Eating Questionnaire offers a concise alternative to the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire for measuring eating behaviors related to weight loss",
abstract = "Objective During a one-year weight loss trial, we compared the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), a valid 51-item measure of restraint, disinhibition, and hunger subscales, with the newer 16-item Weight-Related Eating Questionnaire (WREQ) measuring routine and compensatory restraint and external and emotional eating. Methods Both questionnaires were administered to women with overweight or obesity (n = 186, mean ± SD, age 50 ± 10.6 y, BMI 34 ± 4.2 kg/m2) at five time points. Completion rates were 100{\%} at baseline and Month 1, 94{\%} at Month 3, 83{\%} at Month 6, and 76{\%} at Month 12. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on baseline WREQ data and correlations were calculated between TFEQ and WREQ subscales. Multilevel models evaluated the relationship between each subscale and weight change over time. Results Factor analysis revealed a WREQ structure consistent with previous research, and corresponding subscales on the TFEQ and WREQ were correlated. Lower baseline TFEQ restraint predicted greater weight loss. Across five administrations, TFEQ and WREQ restraint scores were positively related to weight loss (p < 0.01) and TFEQ disinhibition and WREQ external and emotional eating scores were negatively related (p < 0.001). Thus, with one baseline administration, only TFEQ restraint was significantly related to weight change, but multiple administrations showed relationships between all TFEQ and WREQ subscales and weight change. Conclusions The WREQ offers a shorter alternative to the TFEQ when repeatedly assessing eating behaviors related to weight change.",
author = "James, {Brittany L.} and Eric Loken and Roe, {Liane Stevens} and Rolls, {Barbara Jean}",
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T1 - The Weight-Related Eating Questionnaire offers a concise alternative to the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire for measuring eating behaviors related to weight loss

AU - James, Brittany L.

AU - Loken, Eric

AU - Roe, Liane Stevens

AU - Rolls, Barbara Jean

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - Objective During a one-year weight loss trial, we compared the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), a valid 51-item measure of restraint, disinhibition, and hunger subscales, with the newer 16-item Weight-Related Eating Questionnaire (WREQ) measuring routine and compensatory restraint and external and emotional eating. Methods Both questionnaires were administered to women with overweight or obesity (n = 186, mean ± SD, age 50 ± 10.6 y, BMI 34 ± 4.2 kg/m2) at five time points. Completion rates were 100% at baseline and Month 1, 94% at Month 3, 83% at Month 6, and 76% at Month 12. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on baseline WREQ data and correlations were calculated between TFEQ and WREQ subscales. Multilevel models evaluated the relationship between each subscale and weight change over time. Results Factor analysis revealed a WREQ structure consistent with previous research, and corresponding subscales on the TFEQ and WREQ were correlated. Lower baseline TFEQ restraint predicted greater weight loss. Across five administrations, TFEQ and WREQ restraint scores were positively related to weight loss (p < 0.01) and TFEQ disinhibition and WREQ external and emotional eating scores were negatively related (p < 0.001). Thus, with one baseline administration, only TFEQ restraint was significantly related to weight change, but multiple administrations showed relationships between all TFEQ and WREQ subscales and weight change. Conclusions The WREQ offers a shorter alternative to the TFEQ when repeatedly assessing eating behaviors related to weight change.

AB - Objective During a one-year weight loss trial, we compared the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), a valid 51-item measure of restraint, disinhibition, and hunger subscales, with the newer 16-item Weight-Related Eating Questionnaire (WREQ) measuring routine and compensatory restraint and external and emotional eating. Methods Both questionnaires were administered to women with overweight or obesity (n = 186, mean ± SD, age 50 ± 10.6 y, BMI 34 ± 4.2 kg/m2) at five time points. Completion rates were 100% at baseline and Month 1, 94% at Month 3, 83% at Month 6, and 76% at Month 12. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on baseline WREQ data and correlations were calculated between TFEQ and WREQ subscales. Multilevel models evaluated the relationship between each subscale and weight change over time. Results Factor analysis revealed a WREQ structure consistent with previous research, and corresponding subscales on the TFEQ and WREQ were correlated. Lower baseline TFEQ restraint predicted greater weight loss. Across five administrations, TFEQ and WREQ restraint scores were positively related to weight loss (p < 0.01) and TFEQ disinhibition and WREQ external and emotional eating scores were negatively related (p < 0.001). Thus, with one baseline administration, only TFEQ restraint was significantly related to weight change, but multiple administrations showed relationships between all TFEQ and WREQ subscales and weight change. Conclusions The WREQ offers a shorter alternative to the TFEQ when repeatedly assessing eating behaviors related to weight change.

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