The woof at the door

Pat Shipman

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pat Shipman describes how dogs are descended from wolves, probably the gray wolf. Some scientists argue that, because dogs and wolves can and do interbreed, they should not be considered to be separate species at all. Modem wolves and dogs can be distinguished reasonably easily by their appearance. The most telling feature of dogs is the snout, which is significantly shorter and wider than wolves' snouts. Another way of estimating the time at which domestic dogs originated is to consider their genetic differences from wolves. Germonpré and her colleagues thought that researchers might have overlooked early prehistoric dogs in the fossil record of the Upper Paleolithic, so they analyzed skulls of large from various European sites. The Goyet dog fossil shows that the domestication of the first animal was roughly contemporaneous with two fascinating developments in Europe.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages286-289
Number of pages4
Volume97
No4
Specialist publicationAmerican Scientist
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

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domestication
Paleolithic
skull
dog
fossil record
fossil
animal
Europe

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Shipman, Pat. / The woof at the door. In: American Scientist. 2009 ; Vol. 97, No. 4. pp. 286-289.
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Shipman, P 2009, 'The woof at the door' American Scientist, vol. 97, no. 4, pp. 286-289. https://doi.org/10.1511/2009.79.286

The woof at the door. / Shipman, Pat.

In: American Scientist, Vol. 97, No. 4, 01.07.2009, p. 286-289.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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