Therapeutic additions and possible deletions in oncology in 2011

S. A. Holstein, Raymond Hohl

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Approval of agents for the treatment of cancers by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was granted to only six new chemical entities in the three years spanning 2008 to 2010. By contrast, in the first nine months of 2011, six new chemical entities were approved for use in cancer. This approval rate is unprecedented and reflects the advances in science since the approval of the first monoclonal antibody (rituximab) in 1997 and the first targeted small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (imatinib) in 2001 for non-Hodgkins lymphoma and chronic myelogenous leukemia, respectively. Here we briefly discuss the newly approved agents, a possible deletion from the therapeutic armamentarium, and the use of the FDA accelerated approval process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-17
Number of pages3
JournalClinical pharmacology and therapeutics
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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United States Food and Drug Administration
Therapeutic Uses
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Neoplasms
Monoclonal Antibodies
Therapeutics
Imatinib Mesylate
Rituximab

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

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Therapeutic additions and possible deletions in oncology in 2011. / Holstein, S. A.; Hohl, Raymond.

In: Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, Vol. 91, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 15-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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