Thermoeconomic analysis of a gas turbine and cascaded CO2 combined cycle using thermal oil as an intermediate heat-transfer fluid

Yue Cao, Alexander S. Rattner, Yiping Dai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper reports an investigation of a gas turbine (GT) and two-stage cascaded supercritical and transcritical CO2 (s-CO2/t-CO2) combined power cycle using liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a low-temperature heat sink. This cycle may be well-suited for installation near LNG import terminals. GT exhaust supplies input heat to an intermediate s-CO2 cycle through a thermal oil loop. Waste heat from the s-CO2 cycle and residual heat from the GT cycle drives a lower temperature t-CO2 cycle. The t-CO2 cycle is LNG-cooled. A solution procedure is performed to perform a coupled analysis of the thermodynamic and economic performance of this combined cycle. Results show that the GT-cascade CO2 combined cycle has an optimal operating point determined by the s-CO2 compressor inlet conditions. Genetic algorithm (GA) optimization indicates that a Taurus 60 GT-cascaded CO2 combined cycle could reach 51.44% efficiency. For 20-year lifetime and 5% rate of interest, thermoeconomic optimization (after-tax profit, ATP as objective) results show ATP, levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and net power are $2.935 × 106, $0.0420 kWh−1 and 8.886 MW, respectively. Findings suggest that the GT-cascaded CO2 combined cycle is an efficient and commercially viable technology for power generation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1253-1268
Number of pages16
JournalEnergy
Volume162
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Pollution
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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