Thinking big and thinking small: A conceptual framework for best practices in community and stakeholder engagement in food, energy, and water systems

Andrew Kliskey, Paula Williams, David L. Griffith, Virginia H. Dale, Chelsea Schelly, Anna Maria Marshall, Valoree S. Gagnon, Weston M. Eaton, Kristin Floress

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Community and stakeholder engagement is increasingly recognized as essential to science at the nexus of food, energy, and water systems (FEWS) to address complex issues surrounding food and energy production and water provision for society. Yet no comprehensive framework exists for supporting best practices in community and stakeholder engagement for FEWS. A review and meta‐synthesis were undertaken of a broad range of existing models, frameworks, and toolkits for community and stakeholder engagement. A framework is proposed that comprises situational awareness of the FEWS place or problem, creation of a suitable culture for engagement, focus on power‐sharing in the engagement process, co‐ownership, co‐generation of knowledge and outcomes, the technical process of integration, the monitoring processes of reflective and reflexive experiences, and formative evaluation. The framework is discussed as a scaffolding for supporting the development and application of best practices in community and stakeholder engagement in ways that are arguably essential for sound FEWS science and sustainable management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2160
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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