Third-person perception about domestic violence among experts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study used a test and re-test of the same third-person perception instrument with similar participants to attempt to replicate findings. Both studies used emergency medical personnel (study 1, N = 587 urban hospital personnel; study 2, N = 212 suburban and rural hospital personnel) to assess the impact of actual expertise on third-person perception regarding media depictions of domestic violence. Results were stronger than anticipated, yielding instead first-person perception. The study contributes to the growing literature linking third/first-person perception to optimistic bias and extends the behavioral component of person-perception research by testing a relationship with self-efficacy, with mixed results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-474
Number of pages12
JournalNorth American Journal of Psychology
Volume9
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Fingerprint

Domestic Violence
domestic violence
expert
human being
Hospital Personnel
personnel
Rural Hospitals
Urban Hospitals
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Emergencies
expertise
trend
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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Third-person perception about domestic violence among experts. / Chapin, John R.

In: North American Journal of Psychology, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.12.2007, p. 463-474.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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