Third-person perception and optimistic bias among urban minority at-risk youth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent third-person perception articles suggest that optimistic bias is the mechanism underlying the perceptual bias but fail to empirically test the assumption. A small inverse relationship between third-person perception and optimistic bias was found among the youth surveyed: 51% of the students exhibited third-person perceptions, believing they were less influenced by televised safer-sex messages than were their peers. These students were less optimistic about their chances of becoming HIV infected than their peers; 34% exhibited first-person perceptions, believing they were more influenced by the messages than were peers, and were more optimistic than were their peers concerning HIV infection. Most students (89%) exhibited some degree of optimistic bias regarding their chances of avoiding HIV infection in the future. The findings effectively link the two literatures within a sample neglected by previous studies: urban, minority, at-risk youth. The study advances knowledge of third-person perceptions by suggesting underlying social-psychological mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-81
Number of pages31
JournalCommunication Research
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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minority
Students
human being
trend
student
Minorities
Person Perception
Peers
AIDS/HIV
Infection

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

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Third-person perception and optimistic bias among urban minority at-risk youth. / Chapin, John R.

In: Communication Research, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.01.2000, p. 51-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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