Third Soviet-American gases and aerosols (SAGA 3) experiment: overview and meteorological and oceanographic conditions

J. E. Johnson, V. M. Koropalov, K. E. Pickering, A. M. Thompson, N. Bond, J. W. Elkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The primary goal of the third joint Soviet-American Gases and Aerosols (SAGA 2) experiment was to study trace gases and aerosols in the remote marine boundary layer. SAGA 3/leg 1 took place from February 13 to March 13, 1990, aboard the former Soviet R/V Akademik Korolev and consisted of five equatorial transects (designated transects 1 through 5) between 15°N and 10°S on a cruise track from Hilo, Hawaii, to Pago-Pago, American Samoa. Specific objectives were to study 1) the oceanic distribution and air-sea exchange of biogenic trace gases; 2) photochemical cycles of C-, S-, and N- containing gases in the marine boundary layer; 3) the distribution of aerosol particles in the marine boundary layer and their physical and chemical properties; 4) interhemispheric gradients and latitudinal mixing of trace gases and aerosols; and 5) stratospheric aerosol layers. SAGA 3/leg 2 continued from March 17 to April 7, 1990, with one more equatorial transect between American Samoa and the northern coast of the Philippines (transect 6) followed by a final transect to Singapore (transect 7). -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16,893-16,908
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume98
Issue numberD9
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

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