This blog brought to you by … exploring blogger perceptions of a product endorsement policy and reviews

Justin Walden, Denise Sevick Bortree, Marcia W. Distaso

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how a change to a US policy about product testimonials affected bloggers and to understand bloggers’ perceptions of the organization-blogger relationship (OBR). Design/methodology/approach – This study utilizes a survey (n=173) with closed and open-ended questions, and both quantitative and qualitative data are analyzed. Findings – Bloggers’ decisions to accept compensation for a review may influence how much control they feel they have over the OBR. Qualitative data indicate that even as bloggers seek access to products to review, they prefer to maintain editorial control over the review process. Research limitations/implications – The study extends the transparency literature in public relations and relationship management theory by exploring the relationship between bloggers and public relations professionals through the lens of a disclosure policy. Practical implications – Recommendations are offered for public relations professionals in how to maintain transparent relationships with bloggers. Social implications – Qualitative data reveal concern among bloggers about efforts to persuade them and what they should disclose; this may impact the trust that consumers have in reviews at blogs. Originality/value – The study demonstrates the effects of review behaviors on the OBR and offers an organic explanation of how this relationship evolves. This is important as consumers are increasingly consulting blogs for product information. This issue also has relevance to public relations professionals, who are encouraged to broach the issue of transparency with bloggers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-269
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Communication Management
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2015

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product policy
Blogs
Public relations
weblog
organization
transparency
Transparency
management counsulting
Broaches
methodology
Lenses
management
Product endorsement
Values

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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This blog brought to you by … exploring blogger perceptions of a product endorsement policy and reviews. / Walden, Justin; Bortree, Denise Sevick; Distaso, Marcia W.

In: Journal of Communication Management, Vol. 19, No. 3, 03.08.2015, p. 254-269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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