Abstract

A continuous feedback-enabled control system requires simultaneous measurements of the system states and generation of a control output. In neural systems, electric stimulation used to interact with neural activity also creates additional electrical potential variations at measurement points used to monitor neural activity. This stimulus artifact confounds recording of underlying neural activity through the addition of both common mode and differential potentials. We model this artifact as a linearly filtered version of the applied electrical current. We demonstrate a method to determine the properties of this filter using multi-taper techniques for chronically implanted animals stimulated with polarizing low-frequency electric fields (PLEF). When measured repeatedly in chronic experiments with continuous recordings, we observe slow changes of up to 50% transfer function magnitude (figure 1). Such changes reflect a combination bulk impedance changes of the tissue and changes in electrode interface properties. These variations need to be tracked and accommodated for successful chronic continuous feedback neural control systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Subtitle of host publicationEngineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages1380-1383
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781424432967
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Event31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Sep 2 2009Sep 6 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009

Other

Other31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period9/2/099/6/09

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Chernyy, N., Schiff, S. J., & Gluckman, B. J. (2009). Time dependence of stimulation/recording-artifact transfer function estimates for neural interface systems. In Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 (pp. 1380-1383). [5334297] (Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009). IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5334297