Time-resolved fluorescence microscopy of stressed membranes of living endothelial cells

Peter J. Butler, Brian Patterson, Michael Ferko, Benjamin P. Bowen

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

Advances in the understanding of mechanotransduction in endothelial cells require reliable predictive models of stress and readouts of mechano-activation in the same cell. In order to determine correlations between stress and cellular activation, we have coupled rapid 3-D rendering of optical images of stained endothelial cells and computational fluid and mechanics models with photonics-based detection of molecular perturbation. Central to our approach is a multimodal, confocal molecular dynamics microscope with time-correlated, single-photon counting electronics to measure excited-state lifetime dynamics of fluorescent molecules in cell membranes. Preliminary results suggest a correlation of positive shear stress gradients and membrane tension with shear-induced membrane perturbations at sub-micron scales. Such position-dependence of membrane stress concentrations may be used as cues for mechano-chemical signal transduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1826-1829
Number of pages4
JournalConference Record - Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems and Computers
Volume2
StatePublished - 2004
EventConference Record of the Thirty-Eighth Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems and Computers - Pacific Grove, CA, United States
Duration: Nov 7 2004Nov 10 2004

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Signal Processing
  • Computer Networks and Communications

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