Time-series analysis of industrial accident data

Andris Freivalds, Alison B. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Freivalds, A. and Johnson, A.B., 1990. Time-series analysis of industrial accident data. Journal of Occupational Accidents, 13: 179-193. Considering the cyclical nature of accident and injury data, it is reasonable to consider the use of time-series analysis for modeling these data. One approach involved fitting a Box-Jenkins, auto-regressive, moving-average model to the data and using the model to forecast future values. A second approach utilized sine or cosine models to fit the cyclical pattern. A comparison of the two models, for a set of injury data in a glass manufacturing facility, indicated a clear superiority of the Box-Jenkins approach; not only for fitting a seasonal cycle, but also for accommodating monthly trends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-193
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Occupational Accidents
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Fingerprint

Occupational Accidents
Time series analysis
time series analysis
Accidents
accident
Wounds and Injuries
Glass
Data structures
manufacturing
trend
Values
Manufacturing and Industrial Facilities
Datasets

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Safety Research

Cite this

Freivalds, Andris ; Johnson, Alison B. / Time-series analysis of industrial accident data. In: Journal of Occupational Accidents. 1990 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 179-193.
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Time-series analysis of industrial accident data. / Freivalds, Andris; Johnson, Alison B.

In: Journal of Occupational Accidents, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.01.1990, p. 179-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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