Time-series analysis of the female percentage of arrests for property crimes, 1960-1985: A test of alternative explanations

Darrell J. Steffensmeier, Cathy Streifel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine rival explanations of trends in the female share of offending in property crimes since 1960, with particular emphasis on the gender equality or “liberation” thesis. The alternative explanations examined focus on trends in the economic marginality of females and trends in formal policing. The analysis is based on U.S. arrest data covering the 1960-1985 period, with data from a variety of sources that provide aggregate measures of each of the alternative explanations. The findings do not support the traditional liberation thesis. Instead they show that trends in the female share of offending are largely a function of trends in formal policing, and less so of trends in the economic marginalization of females. These findings based on U.S. data are consistent with those of other researchers who have reported recently on cross-national data. At the end of the report, we discuss the significance of our findings for research and theory on female crime.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-103
Number of pages27
JournalJustice Quarterly
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

time series analysis
Crime
offense
trend
liberation
Economics
marginality
Research Personnel
economics
equality
Research
gender

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

Cite this

@article{c584ba3741ae4affb630909f2325666b,
title = "Time-series analysis of the female percentage of arrests for property crimes, 1960-1985: A test of alternative explanations",
abstract = "We examine rival explanations of trends in the female share of offending in property crimes since 1960, with particular emphasis on the gender equality or “liberation” thesis. The alternative explanations examined focus on trends in the economic marginality of females and trends in formal policing. The analysis is based on U.S. arrest data covering the 1960-1985 period, with data from a variety of sources that provide aggregate measures of each of the alternative explanations. The findings do not support the traditional liberation thesis. Instead they show that trends in the female share of offending are largely a function of trends in formal policing, and less so of trends in the economic marginalization of females. These findings based on U.S. data are consistent with those of other researchers who have reported recently on cross-national data. At the end of the report, we discuss the significance of our findings for research and theory on female crime.",
author = "Steffensmeier, {Darrell J.} and Cathy Streifel",
year = "1992",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/07418829200091261",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "9",
pages = "77--103",
journal = "Justice Quarterly",
issn = "0741-8825",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

Time-series analysis of the female percentage of arrests for property crimes, 1960-1985 : A test of alternative explanations. / Steffensmeier, Darrell J.; Streifel, Cathy.

In: Justice Quarterly, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.01.1992, p. 77-103.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Time-series analysis of the female percentage of arrests for property crimes, 1960-1985

T2 - A test of alternative explanations

AU - Steffensmeier, Darrell J.

AU - Streifel, Cathy

PY - 1992/1/1

Y1 - 1992/1/1

N2 - We examine rival explanations of trends in the female share of offending in property crimes since 1960, with particular emphasis on the gender equality or “liberation” thesis. The alternative explanations examined focus on trends in the economic marginality of females and trends in formal policing. The analysis is based on U.S. arrest data covering the 1960-1985 period, with data from a variety of sources that provide aggregate measures of each of the alternative explanations. The findings do not support the traditional liberation thesis. Instead they show that trends in the female share of offending are largely a function of trends in formal policing, and less so of trends in the economic marginalization of females. These findings based on U.S. data are consistent with those of other researchers who have reported recently on cross-national data. At the end of the report, we discuss the significance of our findings for research and theory on female crime.

AB - We examine rival explanations of trends in the female share of offending in property crimes since 1960, with particular emphasis on the gender equality or “liberation” thesis. The alternative explanations examined focus on trends in the economic marginality of females and trends in formal policing. The analysis is based on U.S. arrest data covering the 1960-1985 period, with data from a variety of sources that provide aggregate measures of each of the alternative explanations. The findings do not support the traditional liberation thesis. Instead they show that trends in the female share of offending are largely a function of trends in formal policing, and less so of trends in the economic marginalization of females. These findings based on U.S. data are consistent with those of other researchers who have reported recently on cross-national data. At the end of the report, we discuss the significance of our findings for research and theory on female crime.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84946285305&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84946285305&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/07418829200091261

DO - 10.1080/07418829200091261

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84946285305

VL - 9

SP - 77

EP - 103

JO - Justice Quarterly

JF - Justice Quarterly

SN - 0741-8825

IS - 1

ER -