Tobacco craving, nicotine dependence, and quit intentions among lgb and non-lgb high school students: A quasi-experimental analysis

Sunday Azagba, Lingpeng Shan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There is evidence of higher tobacco use among lesbian or gay and bisexual (LGB) populations. However, a limited number of studies have examined whether there are differences in potential indicators of future tobacco cessation behaviors between LGB and non-LGB populations. This study examined whether sexual identity is associated with craving, nicotine dependence, and quit intentions among high school students. Data were drawn from the 2020 National Youth Tobacco Survey (n = 1642). A propensity score matching (PSM) technique was used to address covariate imbalance among sexual identity groups. Additionally, subgroup analyses were performed for both males and females. The PSM results showed higher odds of craving among students who were gay or lesbian (aOR, 1.70; 95% CI = 1.13–2.55) and bisexual (aOR, 1.89; 95% CI = 1.23–2.92) compared to heterosexual (straight) students. In the sex-based subgroup analyses, we found that gay or lesbian (aOR, 1.92; 95% CI = 1.10–3.34) and bisexual (aOR, 3.12; 95% CI, 1.46–6.66) male students had significantly higher odds of craving when compared to heterosexual/straight male adolescents. However, the association was not significant in female students. Additionally, female bisexuals had significantly lower odds for quit intention (aOR, 0.48; 95% CI = 0.29–0.81) when compared to heterosexual/straight female adolescents. Results also showed no significant differences between LGB and non-LGB students for nicotine dependence. Sexual minority adolescents, especially male adolescents, were more likely to have tobacco cravings and bisexual females had lower odds of quit intention than heterosexual peers. Prevention efforts targeting this subpopulation may be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9000
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume18
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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